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July 16, 2009

Tennessee Session One - 7/16/09

Tennessee Session One - 7/16/09

Today we continued our talk on proper foundations of the Bible and learned more about the big story that is told through the Bible as a whole. As a whole, the series on Proper Foundations has been really inspiring to me to want to read through the entire Bible, cover to cover, one because I've never done it before, and two, because I want to read it and be able to see it in chronological order as it was meant to be read. After Dr. Turner finished, Dr. Phillips did a series of talks on the tough questions both believers and non-believers ask, questions on things like the reliability of the scriptures, pluralism and why we have evil in the world. For me, it was really interesting to see how many reliable answers we have for all of the questions that people ask. It was cool to learn about all of the different outside testimonies that there are to the deity of Christ, beginning in the first century and continuing until now. One of my favorite ideas from the day was that archeology and history do not prove the Bible; the Bible proves archaeology and history. I also liked Dr. Phillips statement that a Biblical worldview will commit you to a view of reality that is larger than your ability to explain everything it contains. There are many times when I feel like I need to be able to explain everything within my worldview, but the truth of the matter is that some things are inexplicable, and the burden of proof is not always on us. To close out the day, Mr. Ben Williams talked about where we go from here. The bottom line of his talk was that we are called to love people for the way that God sees them - to truly love them, not use them. He used Mark 12:29-31 to base his talk on which says, "Love the LORD your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with your entire mind, and with all your strength. Love your neighbor as yourself."
As a whole, Summit had taught me the importance of reading and knowing the Bible well. I've also learned the importance of knowing the opposite side of the issue I'm talking about as well. As Christians, like Mr. Williams said tonight, we are called to love all people as ourselves and value them as human beings, not just objects that we use from day to day and then throw away. Two big questions that have hit me and made me think a lot these past two week have been "What is human?" and "What is hope?" The question "What is human?" hit me mainly because of the real question it was asking. My first thought was "Do we really not know what human is anymore? Have we really taken things that far?" And the more talks I listened to, the more I realized, yes, we have taken things that far. We have no value of human life. We, as a culture have no concept of God, a loving God at that, or what it means to have purpose and meaning to life. Since we don't know what it is to have meaning, we don't know what it is to have hope; we don't know what hope is. One of my favorite speakers, Mr. John Stonestreet put it quite simply - hope is knowing that Christ has risen. As Christians, we have hope and we know that meaning in our lives because Christ has risen. And with that hope we are to go into all the nations and make disciples of all men. Summit as a whole has given me motivation to go back and share what I've learned with everyone I can, but also to do my part of the research and reading and digging into the Word. I know that defending my faith is something that I will be doing for a really long time, and I definitely want go as far as I can and learn as much as possible about what I believe and why and Summit 2009 has given me a great start at that.
Kaitlyn


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